Menu Close

THE DIAL

Published occasionally in London between 1889-1897, the five volumes of The Dial were edited by Charles Ricketts and Charles Shannon. The editors published the first three volumes privately and the last two through the Vale Press run by Ricketts and Hacon. The Yellow Nineties digital edition is based on physical copies held in Ryerson University Library Archives and Special Collections and digitized copies from the Mark Samuels Lasner Collection, University of Delaware Library, Museums and Press. Our PDFs have been uploaded to the Internet Archive so that a virtual facsimile in flipbook format is available for users. The marked-up searchable edition of The Dial is planned for publication in 2020, along with a completed editorial apparatus. Currently available are a General Introduction to The Dial‘s print run and a Critical Introduction for volume 1 and volume 2, together with biographical essays on some of the magazine’s contributors. Brief biographical data on contributors is available through the Y90s Personography. The Database of Ornament allows users to study The Dial‘s textual ornaments in individual detail and in comparison to textual ornaments in The Evergreen and The Savoy.

The Dial Digital Edition received support from a Linda H. Peterson Fellowship awarded by the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals and funded from the bequest of the Eileen Curran estate.

Editor:                Lorraine Janzen Kooistra

Editorial Team:  Reg Beatty, Emma Fraschetti, Alexandrea Fiorante, Benjamin Ghan, Alexandra Pospisil, Sarah Pennington

General introduction to The Dial


Volume 1
1889

Cover of The Dial Volume 1

Scholarly Introduction:  HTML     XML     PDF
Table of Contents:  HTML     XML     PDF
Volume:  HTML                   PDF
Flipbook

Reviews
Promotional Materials


Volume 2
1892

Cover of The Dial Volume 2

Scholarly Introduction:  HTML     XML     PDF
Table of Contents:  HTML     XML     PDF
Volume:  HTML                   PDF
Flipbook

Reviews
Promotional Materials


Volume 3
1893

Cover of The Dial Volume 3

Scholarly Introduction:  HTML     XML     PDF
Table of Contents:  HTML     XML     PDF
Volume:  HTML                   PDF
Flipbook

Reviews
Promotional Materials


Volume 4
1896

Cover of The Dial Volume 4

Scholarly Introduction:  HTML     XML     PDF
Table of Contents:  HTML     XML     PDF
Volume:  HTML                   PDF
Flipbook

Reviews
Promotional Materials


Volume 5
1897

The image is printed in black ink on buff coloured paper. It is centered in portrait orientation on the page. In the upper right region of the image, a large scroll or cartouche displaying the text “The Dial: An Occasional Publication Edited by C.S. Ricketts and CH. Shannon” in large capital letters is positioned on a tall structure made from wooden cross beams. Ten white doves appear to be flying above in both directions to land on the top beam of the structure. Below the large scroll is a sheaf of roses and a labelled image of Icarus, naked , with his arms outstretched beside him to hold up his wings. Icarus is standing in front of the sun and is surrounded by flames and various scattered flowers. A framed box is below the Icarus iconography displaying a stylized monogram of the capital letters “VP.” The “P,” runs down the centre of the “V,” and has a leaf emerging from it on the left. Below the monogram is the publishing information: “L. Hacon and CS Ricketts 52 Warwick Street Regent Street.” The artist’s initials “CR” appear centered below the box, set within a book. To the right of this box is an artist’s palette with one brush and a jar with two sprouting plants. In the upper left portion of the image, a sundial and a bell are displayed underneath the lectern-style roof of the structure on the left side, adjacent with the first two lines of text on the scroll. Below them is an open room built in the confines of the wooden cross beams. A woman with a crowned headpiece, long hair, and an ornamented robe, is standing in left profile in the open room. She appears to be leaning against a tall writing desk/prayer stand/ art desk, which is also depicted in profile. The woman’s left arm is bent and rested on the desk and raised beneath her chin. Her right arm is rested up against the desk and she appears to be holding a quill pen with her right hand. The side of the desk contains artisanal instruments such as scissors and engravers. A small grotesque supports one of the legs of the desk at left. Below this pedestal is leaning a violin and a pair of slippers. Scattered across the whole bottom border of the image are leaves or flower petals.

Scholarly Introduction:  HTML     XML     PDF
Table of Contents:  HTML     XML     PDF
Volume:  HTML                   PDF
Flipbook

Reviews
Promotional Materials